Nidra in Nature | Lory State Park | Fort Collins, CO | August 2016

Yoga nidra is likely a new concept to many beer yogis. So let's keep it short & sweet & simple: yoga nidra is a practice of conscious relaxation. It's a meditation that you can do lying down. (Score!) Its benefits rival any physical yoga practice: it connects you to yourself and creates freedom and space in the mind, it relieves mental and physical stress, and ANYONE CAN DO IT. I love my nidra practice as much as I love our fun, social practices at the brewery. And though brewery nidra has actually happened once, it's far from a regular occurrence, so I'm going to share some nidra with you here. 

'Nidra light' at this past summer's yoga & beer retreat, balance on the road: Jackie O's 2016. Though a dark, warm, quiet space is most ideal for yoga nidra, sometimes life and brewery floors just want what they want! 

'Nidra light' at this past summer's yoga & beer retreat, balance on the road: Jackie O's 2016. Though a dark, warm, quiet space is most ideal for yoga nidra, sometimes life and brewery floors just want what they want! 

When I first started teaching in studios, one of my regular classes was a 90 minute Sunday morning gentle practice, and I would often incorporate 20-30 minutes of yoga nidra at the end. Since the days of that class, I've had many requests to record a nidra.

Fast forward about 4 years, and I'm finally starting that project. On recent travels to Colorado, it hit me on a hike through the Rockies. I get so much out of travel and nature. I get connection to myself and everyone and everything around me. Everything becomes bigger and smaller at the same time.

The 'nidra in nature' series was born on that hike, and I'd like to share the first one with you here. This 18 minute audio practice includes traditional technique and scripting blended with a guided imagery of the very nature I was in when I recorded it. You may hear muffled background sounds (of the animal and human variety) and you may hear the quirks and imperfections of an instructor's first attempt at writing and recording a nidra. But if you're present with intention, you'll benefit from your commitment to the practice. 

Enjoy.      

Melissa MajorComment